Wednesday, February 13, 2019

Google Confirms VoIP App About to Go Live - Toolbox

Google has announced it's rolling out the much-anticipated Google Voice VoIP application this week, following a tweet from Scott Johnston, a real-time product innovation lead with Google Voice.

The VoIP feature had been in a lengthy beta testing process and offers users the prospect of making WiFi calls using their Google account.

Under the beta version, Google had also tested the option to use a carrier rather than switching between WiFi and mobile data. Users could make and take calls via mobile carrier forwarding.

The launch allows users to make calls with Google rather than their carrier’s data allowance and by a WiFi connection, or in situations where VoIP will deliver better call clarity than the mobile coverage. It's being made available on both Android and iOS devices.

The launch of Google’s VoIP venture triggered some confusion: In September, eight months into the beta test, some users of the app who had not signed up to the beta test began seeing the feature. The update was never widely disseminated at that stage, however.

Google first announced plans to overhaul its Voice app in 2017. Prior to this launch, Google has not been able to offer conventional VoIP connectivity. Currently, Google Voice is only offered in the US and Canada, with users who have a personal Google or G-Suite account. It's likely to be extended to other countries.

Currently, the case for business usage is not widely discussed. A number of other countries have been scheduled for Google Voice roll out, among them the UK, Japan, France, Spain and Switzerland.

The new feature will be an upgrade – it won’t require a mobile phone number in order to be used. It will be practical for users with a device lacking a SIM card or who want to make a phone call using a web app.

The exact pace of the rollout remains the source of some confusion. Reports last week around the speed and extent of the international roll-out were somewhat contradictory. At this stage, it seems to be sooner to achieving reality than initially suspected.

Exactly how quickly Google will succeed in connecting Google Voice users to the new service is a source of speculation at the time of writing. Other than a single Tweet from Johston, Google has not been forthcoming with details on the rollout.

Key Takeaways:

  • The rollout of Google’s new VoIP service, which has been in beta testing for almost a year, is imminent.
  • Beneficiaries will be users with a Google account in the US and Canada, although the exact speed and extent of the rollout is unclear as Google has simply confirmed via a tweet from a Google developer.
  • Precise plans for business use and international expansion are still vague, but users will be able to use the app like other VoIP services, connecting calls through WiFi or through their mobile data usage, should this be available.


Google Confirms VoIP App About to Go Live - Toolbox

Google has announced it's rolling out the much-anticipated Google Voice VoIP application this week, following a tweet from Scott Johnston, a real-time product innovation lead with Google Voice.

The VoIP feature had been in a lengthy beta testing process and offers users the prospect of making WiFi calls using their Google account.

Under the beta version, Google had also tested the option to use a carrier rather than switching between WiFi and mobile data. Users could make and take calls via mobile carrier forwarding.

The launch allows users to make calls with Google rather than their carrier’s data allowance and by a WiFi connection, or in situations where VoIP will deliver better call clarity than the mobile coverage. It's being made available on both Android and iOS devices.

The launch of Google’s VoIP venture triggered some confusion: In September, eight months into the beta test, some users of the app who had not signed up to the beta test began seeing the feature. The update was never widely disseminated at that stage, however.

Google first announced plans to overhaul its Voice app in 2017. Prior to this launch, Google has not been able to offer conventional VoIP connectivity. Currently, Google Voice is only offered in the US and Canada, with users who have a personal Google or G-Suite account. It's likely to be extended to other countries.

Currently, the case for business usage is not widely discussed. A number of other countries have been scheduled for Google Voice roll out, among them the UK, Japan, France, Spain and Switzerland.

The new feature will be an upgrade – it won’t require a mobile phone number in order to be used. It will be practical for users with a device lacking a SIM card or who want to make a phone call using a web app.

The exact pace of the rollout remains the source of some confusion. Reports last week around the speed and extent of the international roll-out were somewhat contradictory. At this stage, it seems to be sooner to achieving reality than initially suspected.

Exactly how quickly Google will succeed in connecting Google Voice users to the new service is a source of speculation at the time of writing. Other than a single Tweet from Johston, Google has not been forthcoming with details on the rollout.

Key Takeaways:

  • The rollout of Google’s new VoIP service, which has been in beta testing for almost a year, is imminent.
  • Beneficiaries will be users with a Google account in the US and Canada, although the exact speed and extent of the rollout is unclear as Google has simply confirmed via a tweet from a Google developer.
  • Precise plans for business use and international expansion are still vague, but users will be able to use the app like other VoIP services, connecting calls through WiFi or through their mobile data usage, should this be available.


Tuesday, February 12, 2019

Achieving QoS in a Hybrid Cloud Implementation | Insight for the Connected Enterprise - No Jitter

Quality of service, or QoS, is important when mixing real-time and bulk traffic. Add big data applications and the challenge grows. Let’s look at strategies that we can use to protect real-time traffic in a hybrid cloud environment where end-to-end QoS may not be possible.

Hybrid Cloud

I define a hybrid cloud as a combination of an enterprise on-premises cloud system and a remote, vendor-provided cloud system. The on-premises systems typically support either infrastructure or platform delivered in the as-a-service model, while the vendor systems could provide a variety of services (infrastructure, platform, data center, or software). In a hybrid cloud, applications might have components located on premises or externally. An application that has real-time communications requirements between sites should be prioritized over non-real-time traffic.

You may also have a software service, such as VoIP, that has real-time components. Somehow, you must connect your voice endpoints within the enterprise to the voice control system service. Call control services typically have less critical timing constraints than real-time streams going to conference calling services located in a cloud provider’s infrastructure.

No QoS over the Internet

QoS is normally used to prioritize different types of traffic, relative to each other. The process involves classifying traffic by marking packets with either a class-of-service (CoS) or Differentiated Services Code Point (DSCP) identifier. Once packets are marked, the network uses the embedded CoS/DSCP identifier to perform rate limiting and prioritization for forwarding. Time-sensitive packets get transmitted before less-time-sensitive packets. A QoS design typically has four, eight, or 12 different classes.

The problem on the public Internet is that there are too many competing interests for this simple mechanism to work. Therefore, the Internet typically uses a weighted fair queueing mechanism that favors low-volume traffic flows. This mechanism works well for highly interactive applications with low data volume. Voice traffic typically has a low enough volume that it gets good treatment, especially when compared to things like Web page updates, image files, and streaming video. This is as good as it gets on the public Internet.

Multi-Protocol Label Switching (MPLS)

MPLS technology allows carriers to provide a virtual network to each customer. An eight-class mechanism is available to prioritize traffic within each customer’s virtual network. While this mechanism doesn’t differentiate between customers, it does allow each customer to map its internal CoS/DSCP classes into the MPLS priorities.

Because MPLS is less expensive than using dedicated leased lines, it has been the preferred WAN technology for some time. However, some newer, less expensive technologies have begun supplanting MPLS.

Dedicated On-Ramp Providers

A new class of Internet service provider (ISP) and hosting provider has emerged to facilitate cloud connectivity. These carriers have connections to Internet exchange points (IXPs) where the big cloud providers also have connections. These facilities are where carriers and big companies interconnect their networks. Examples are ISPs, wireless carriers, and big companies like Facebook, Amazon, and Google.

The new class of ISPs connect to the IXPs and then sell either dedicated or MPLS links to enterprise customers. These links can handle QoS and provide a high-speed connection directly to the major cloud hosting provider of choice.

Click below to continue to Page 2: SD-WAN, Other Factors, Summary



Global Mobile VoIP Market SWOT Analysis to 2025 Lead By Facebook, Apple, Google, Microsoft, Skype, StarSSIP, Talk 360, Vonage Holdings, TATA Communications and MagicJack VocalTec - openPR

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Some of the important players in Mobile VoIP market are Facebook, Inc., Apple. Inc., Google, Inc. , Microsoft Corporation, Skype, StarSSIP Ltd, Talk 360, Vonage Holdings Corporation, TATA Communications Ltd, and MagicJack VocalTec. Ltd. among others.

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Mobile VoIP refers to voice over internet protocol. This enables the user to connect to call with other VoIP users through internet. Mobile VoIP helps in reducing charges incurred in making international call over mobile networks, thus getting more and more importance in the market.

Global Mobile VoIP Market report aims to provide a 360-degree view of the market in terms of cutting-edge technology, key developments, drivers, restraints and future trends with impact analysis of these trends on the market for short-term, mid-term and long-term during the forecast period. Further, the report also covers key players profiling with detailed SWOT analysis, financial facts and key developments of products/service from the past three years.

Mobile VoIP Market – Global Analysis to 2025 is an expert compiled study which provides a holistic view of the market covering current trends and future scope with respect to product/service, the report also covers competitive analysis to understand the presence of key vendors in the companies by analyzing their product/services, key financial facts, details SWOT analysis and key development in last three years. Further chapter such as industry landscape and competitive landscape provides the reader with recent company level insights covering mergers and acquisitions, joint ventures, collaborations, new product developments/strategies taking place across the ecosystem. The chapters also evaluate the key vendors by mapping all the relevant products and services to exhibit the ranking/position of top 5 key vendors.

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This release was published on openPR.



Achieving QoS in a Hybrid Cloud Implementation | Insight for the Connected Enterprise - No Jitter

Quality of service, or QoS, is important when mixing real-time and bulk traffic. Add big data applications and the challenge grows. Let’s look at strategies that we can use to protect real-time traffic in a hybrid cloud environment where end-to-end QoS may not be possible.

Hybrid Cloud

I define a hybrid cloud as a combination of an enterprise on-premises cloud system and a remote, vendor-provided cloud system. The on-premises systems typically support either infrastructure or platform delivered in the as-a-service model, while the vendor systems could provide a variety of services (infrastructure, platform, data center, or software). In a hybrid cloud, applications might have components located on premises or externally. An application that has real-time communications requirements between sites should be prioritized over non-real-time traffic.

You may also have a software service, such as VoIP, that has real-time components. Somehow, you must connect your voice endpoints within the enterprise to the voice control system service. Call control services typically have less critical timing constraints than real-time streams going to conference calling services located in a cloud provider’s infrastructure.

No QoS over the Internet

QoS is normally used to prioritize different types of traffic, relative to each other. The process involves classifying traffic by marking packets with either a class-of-service (CoS) or Differentiated Services Code Point (DSCP) identifier. Once packets are marked, the network uses the embedded CoS/DSCP identifier to perform rate limiting and prioritization for forwarding. Time-sensitive packets get transmitted before less-time-sensitive packets. A QoS design typically has four, eight, or 12 different classes.

The problem on the public Internet is that there are too many competing interests for this simple mechanism to work. Therefore, the Internet typically uses a weighted fair queueing mechanism that favors low-volume traffic flows. This mechanism works well for highly interactive applications with low data volume. Voice traffic typically has a low enough volume that it gets good treatment, especially when compared to things like Web page updates, image files, and streaming video. This is as good as it gets on the public Internet.

Multi-Protocol Label Switching (MPLS)

MPLS technology allows carriers to provide a virtual network to each customer. An eight-class mechanism is available to prioritize traffic within each customer’s virtual network. While this mechanism doesn’t differentiate between customers, it does allow each customer to map its internal CoS/DSCP classes into the MPLS priorities.

Because MPLS is less expensive than using dedicated leased lines, it has been the preferred WAN technology for some time. However, some newer, less expensive technologies have begun supplanting MPLS.

Dedicated On-Ramp Providers

A new class of Internet service provider (ISP) and hosting provider has emerged to facilitate cloud connectivity. These carriers have connections to Internet exchange points (IXPs) where the big cloud providers also have connections. These facilities are where carriers and big companies interconnect their networks. Examples are ISPs, wireless carriers, and big companies like Facebook, Amazon, and Google.

The new class of ISPs connect to the IXPs and then sell either dedicated or MPLS links to enterprise customers. These links can handle QoS and provide a high-speed connection directly to the major cloud hosting provider of choice.

Click below to continue to Page 2: SD-WAN, Other Factors, Summary



Monday, February 11, 2019

Cloud VoIP: Look for Unintended Benefits | Insight for the Connected Enterprise - No Jitter

Any enterprise that migrates its voice platforms to a cloud solution expects improvements around technology and service. And perhaps cost. But in large and complex environments, other gains may be discovered, too, as I learned in overseeing just such a migration for a Fortune 500 company.

As regular No Jitter readers may recall, I’m a senior voice architect for a Fortune 500 enterprise that spent much of 2018 selecting and upgrading 50 facilities to cloud-based VoIP service. In my previous posts, I provided a detailed overview of my processes and lessons learned. In this piece, I share the unintended benefits gained through cloud VoIP migration.
  1. Circuit Clean-Up -- To tackle each locations’ upgrade/migration project in the most thorough and complete manner possible, we identified every single circuit, trunk, POTS line, and number at each office and plant. In doing so, we sometimes found old, unused circuits, trunks, and phone numbers. We found some accounts at tariff rates because they weren’t on the master service agreement. We found some sites massively over-engineered. We even discovered some locations with unfinished projects. Unfortunately, none of these things is uncommon in large enterprises.
  2. Seat Shrinkage -- Another realized benefit was seat reductions. I could have exported names and extensions from each PBX and blindly ordered the same number of “seats” for the cloud service. Instead, I exported names and extensions to our project workbook, and then worked with the business to scrub the data. Oftentimes, we could cut the list of stations by 50%, or even more.
  3. E911 Elimination -- I was happy to discover that I could eliminate our third-party E911 service since our new telecom provider has built location services into its system. This simplified MAC work, eliminated a vendor, and lowered my cost.
  4. Network Switch Reductions -- We also sometimes discovered that we could reduce the number of network switches, simply due to attrition over time. This reduces maintenance costs, cooling costs, and rack-space footprint.

Don’t mistake this quick list for simplicity. Before initiating a migration at any site, we performed a full audit. The process was painstaking at times, but worth the effort given the additional perks uncovered.

Note too, that being able to share benefits such as these is a great way to sell business and technology stakeholders on a project -- and keep them engaged throughout the process.

In part four of this series, I’ll discuss the importance of teamwork and leadership.



Uber App Rolls out VOIP In-App Calling to Call Your Driver - Techchahiye